Similar case studies

REF impact found 8 Case Studies

Currently displayed text from case study:

Changing communication skills training methods with the Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM)

Summary of the impact

The impact claimed is the international uptake and successful commercialization (as www.carmtraining.org) across public, private and third-sector organizations, of a pioneering method for communication skills training called the `Conversation Analytic Role-play Method' (CARM). CARM's development was funded by the ESRC knowledge-exchange scheme and is based on research conducted at Loughborough University. It has reach and significance in attitude change in training culture: 130+ workshops have taken place at 60+ organizations since 2008. CARM's impact on training practice is evidenced by its accreditation by the College of Mediators for the Continuing Professional Development of mediators. CARM won Loughborough's Social-Enterprise Award (2013).

Submitting Institution

Loughborough University

Unit of Assessment

Communication, Cultural and Media Studies, Library and Information ManagementĀ 

Summary Impact Type

Societal

Research Subject Area(s)

Studies In Human Society: Criminology
Psychology and Cognitive Sciences: Psychology

Investigative interviews with suspects of crime

Summary of the impact

Both the introduction of legislation in England and Wales and the mandatory recording of interviews with criminal suspects has led to an increased examination and understanding of what happens in such interviews. Such studies have led to a prescribed framework, which following its implementation, has led to further study concerning its efficacy in gathering a reliable account. This case study, demonstrates how (through dissemination of the research and through working with practitioners) particular research findings concerning approaches to the investigative interviewing of suspects have influenced the practices of those users of the research both in this country and overseas.

Submitting Institution

University of Derby

Unit of Assessment

Law

Summary Impact Type

Legal

Research Subject Area(s)

Studies In Human Society: Criminology

Enabling high-quality, low power mobile broadband services

Summary of the impact

Femtocells provide short-range (e.g. 10m) wireless coverage which enables a conventional cellular communication system to be accessed indoors. Their widespread and growing use has been aided by the work in UoA11 by the University of Bedfordshire (UoB).

In 2008, while the femtocell concept was still in its infancy, researchers at UoB with expertise in wireless networks recognised that coverage prediction and interference reduction techniques would be essential if the benefits of that concept were to be realised.

Collaboration with two industrial partners (an international organisation and a regional SME) resulted in tools that enable operators to simulate typical femtocell deployment scenarios, such as urban, dense apartments, terraced house and small offices, before femtocells can be reliably deployed by users without affecting the rest of the network (a benefit of the technology). These tools have been deployed by those partners to support their businesses. A widely-cited textbook, written for network engineers, researchers and final year students, has brought knowledge of femtocell operation to a wider audience.

Submitting Institution

University of Bedfordshire

Unit of Assessment

Computer Science and Informatics

Summary Impact Type

Technological

Research Subject Area(s)

Information and Computing Sciences: Computation Theory and Mathematics, Information Systems
Technology: Communications Technologies

The GRiST computer decision support system: a new tool for assessing and managing risks associated with mental-health problems.

Summary of the impact

The Galatean Risk and Safety Tool (GRiST) is a clinical decision support system (CDSS) conceived and developed by computer scientists at Aston University from 2000 onwards, where it is being delivered as a cloud-computing service. It is used every day by mental-health practitioners in the NHS, charities, and private hospitals to assess and manage risks associated with mental-health problems. Between 1/1/2011 and 31/7/2013, clinicians provided 285,426 completed patient risk assessments using GRiST. It has changed organisational and clinical processes by its systematic collection of risk information, explicitly linking data to clinical risk judgements, and showing how those judgments are derived. Increasing international awareness has come through presentations to mental-health practitioners in Europe, America, and Australia.

Submitting Institution

Aston University

Unit of Assessment

Computer Science and Informatics

Summary Impact Type

Technological

Research Subject Area(s)

Medical and Health Sciences: Public Health and Health Services
Economics: Applied Economics

Craniofacial Depiction for Forensic Identification and Archaeological Investigation

Summary of the impact

Wilkinson has developed, evaluated and applied techniques, standards and datasets for facial depiction and identification of the dead. The impacts include:

  • Improved social welfare by establishing an international forensic tool that has enhanced forensic identification from human remains, and correspondingly improved law enforcement services and disaster victim identification.
  • Delivered highly skilled people and international standards in forensic craniofacial identification.
  • Provided cultural enrichment through enhanced public engagement with science and art internationally, through the craniofacial depiction of historical figures and ancient human remains.

Submitting Institution

University of Dundee

Unit of Assessment

Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory

Summary Impact Type

Technological

Research Subject Area(s)

Biological Sciences: Genetics
Information and Computing Sciences: Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing
Studies In Human Society: Anthropology

Safely reducing antibiotic prescriptions to help contain antibiotic resistance.

Summary of the impact

Research by Cardiff University is contributing to initiatives within the NHS and across Europe to safely reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing and thus help contain antimicrobial resistant bacteria. Our researchers conducted observational studies of prescribing patterns linked to local resistance data and qualitative research with GPs and patients on their perceptions of acute respiratory tract infections and antibiotic use and resistance. This enabled the Cardiff team to develop clinician training and patient education resources (covering issues such as communication skills, point of care testing, and typical duration of infections) to reduce unnecessary prescribing. Our trials proved these interventions were effective, at times cutting prescribing by as much as two-thirds. Our research has provided the basis for new clinical guidelines, antibiotic stewardship initiatives and policies, and educational tools for clinicians and patients that are being used in the UK and internationally.

Submitting Institution

Cardiff University

Unit of Assessment

Public Health, Health Services and Primary Care

Summary Impact Type

Health

Research Subject Area(s)

Medical and Health Sciences: Medical Microbiology, Public Health and Health Services

Fast binary decision algorithms to enable real time diagnosis of in-flight faults in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Summary of the impact

Led by Professor Andrews, a computational method for real time mission planning, based on Binary Decision Diagrams (BDD), was developed in the Mathematical Sciences Department at Loughborough University (LU) from 1993-2003. This is fast and accurate and can be used to support decision-making on system utilisation in real-time operation, which has led to the ability to diagnose in flight faults for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications.

The research has changed the understanding and awareness of the advantages of BDD, resulting in integration into major industrial trials and proprietary software products, including at BAE Systems, one of the world's largest companies in an area of vital importance to UK security and economic development. The methodology has attracted significant research funding in collaborative programmes with industry.

Submitting Institution

Loughborough University

Unit of Assessment

Mathematical Sciences

Summary Impact Type

Technological

Research Subject Area(s)

Mathematical Sciences: Applied Mathematics
Information and Computing Sciences: Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing, Information Systems

Minimally invasive procedural training for clinicians using virtual patients

Summary of the impact

We demonstrate the impact of deploying real time 3D computer graphics and haptics technologies in the context of training minimally invasive procedures. It is widely accepted in medical specialties that a reform in teaching methods must be made to meet today's high volume training requirements. Receiving instruction in a core set of skills and procedures before novice practitioners are exposed to the traditional, patient based, apprenticeship model has been shown will reduce the time needed to acquire skills, maintain competence, and reduce the initial errors made on patients. The case study centres on three simulators developed at Bangor (Figure 1).

A. Ultrasound guided needle puncture Figure 1: Minimally Invasive Procedural Training Simulators B. Interventional Radiology – Seldinger Technique Figure 1: Minimally Invasive Procedural Training Simulators C. Neurosurgery – Vcath iPad App Figure 1: Minimally Invasive Procedural Training Simulators
Figure 1: Minimally Invasive Procedural Training Simulators

Submitting Institution

Bangor University

Unit of Assessment

Computer Science and Informatics

Summary Impact Type

Health

Research Subject Area(s)

Physical Sciences: Other Physical Sciences
Information and Computing Sciences: Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing
Engineering: Biomedical Engineering

Filter Impact Case Studies

Download Impact Case Studies